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Japan is hit by a ballistic missile fired from North Korea

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Japan is hit by a ballistic missile fired from North Korea

The South Korean government said that on Tuesday, North Korea fired an intermediate-range ballistic missile that flew over Japan for the first time in five years. This set off alarms all over Japan.

North Korea’s launch on Tuesday made it possible for U.S. military bases in Guam to be hit. The White House said that the U.S. government was against the launch and that National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan called his counterparts in Japan and South Korea to talk about how to respond.

South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff say that the ballistic missile (IRBM) was fired from North Korea’s northern Jagang province at about 7:23 a.m. local time. TV alerts told people in Tokyo and the northern Japanese prefectures of Hokkaido and Aomori to take cover.

North Korea says it is a country with nuclear weapons.
ASIA
North Korea says it is a country with nuclear weapons.
The joint chiefs of the South said that the missile went about 2,796 miles to the east, got as high as 603 miles, and went as fast as Mach 17 before landing in the Pacific Ocean. When something moves at Mach 1, it moves at the speed of sound. The speed of sound is half of Mach 2.

Japan’s Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said that the launch on Tuesday was “outrageous,” and he said that Japan strongly opposed the move. South Korea’s President Yoon Suk Yeol said that his country would respond in a strong way. Both leaders said they would talk about the situation with the National Security Council.

North Korea fired its fifth missile in just over a week on Tuesday. It was the first time since 2017 that a North Korean missile flew over Japan. When North Korea last tested an IRBM in January, state media said that it was fired at a high angle “out of concern for the security of neighbouring countries.” This means that the missile was not sent over Japan.

North Korea’s launch of a missile on Tuesday was the latest in a string of recent events that have made things worse between Pyongyang and the U.S. and its East Asian allies. Last week, South Korea, the U.S., and Japan held their first joint drills against submarines in five years. The drills took place off the east coast of the Korean Peninsula. It happened after South Korean and American warships had been practising together in the area for four days. The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan was used in both military drills this week.

Because of these tensions, then-President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met for the first time in 2018 and 2019 to talk about the North’s plans to make nuclear weapons. Since then, talks between the United States and North Korea have stopped, and Pyongyang now says it won’t give up its nuclear weapons.

Since it took office in May, South Korea’s new conservative government has put more emphasis on deterrence than on diplomatic engagement. This has raised concerns about possible cycles of escalation and counter-escalation, such as more missile tests from North Korea.

Observers say that Kim could use North Korea’s missile and nuclear tests to get the U.S. and other countries to lift the international sanctions against his country.

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